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Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives
Chiarugi oboe reed knives

Chiarugi oboe reed knives

$39.99 USD

Oboe reed knives made by Chiarugi in an assortment of options. Crafted from high-quality steel with hardwood handles. These are great quality knives at affordable prices for students and professionals alike. 

Sometimes people will ask me about reed knives, which ones I like, which one  I think is best, and which one I recommend. I have certain knives that I use a lot, and some that I use only on occasion, this is not because I think some are inherently better than others, but because I find that some work better for certain scrapes, and some work better others. The analogy I often use is that reed knives are like paintbrushes, a painter has a lot to choose from, different stages of the artwork will require a different brush. The initial covering of the canvas with paint requires a different tool than the final details of a person’s face. I often use a heavy beveled knife to initially scrape off the outer layers of bark, but I do not tend to use that same knife when finishing the tip of oboe reeds. This is not to say that a reed cannot be made with one knife alone, but I prefer to used a few different blades at different stages in the process. 

Beveled reed knife- A must have for removing the ears off oboe reed blanks. I used beveled reed knives to removed bark and scrape oboe reeds on the first day of scraping. 

Wedge reed knife/double hollow ground- the wedge style knife by Chiarugi is a great “all around” knife that can quickly remove cane from the outer layers, but is light enough to make the final tip adjustments of the reed making process. 

Single hollow ground reed knife- Similar to the beveled knife, but is ground to be concave on the bottom side. 

Razor knife- has a very thin spine, and a very light blade. Some people used for clipping the tip of the reed on a cutting block. Can take on a defined  burr when used with a burnishing rod, which can be wonderful for tip work and defining the different sections of the reed. 

Pen knife- similar to the razor knife, but shorter. A great, compact reed knife to have in your oboe case for adjusting reeds while not at your reed desk.